Frank Lloyd Wright’s World Heritage Works

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s World Heritage Works

It is difficult to understand the modern architecture’s evolution without taking Wright into account. Then UNESCO has affirmed this by making eight of his creations part of the World Heritage List.

As architects, our architecture firms in Miami has studied the Frank Lloyd Wright’s work. The integration of his works with the environment and the treatment of interior spaces, establishing for the first time the difference between <defined spaces> and <closed spaces>, concepts that he applied in his projects and that are still valid today.

  • Taliesin home in Spring Green, Wisconsin

It is Frank Lloyd Wright’s home, its initial design was based on the principles of design of Praire School. It is a building with a single floor and it cover by yellow limestone (from a nearby quarry). There are big windows in order to fact that natural light and 1.100 squares meters.

  • Taliesin West, Arizona

After an arson and the murder of 6 people (including his wife and her 2 children) by a Wright employee; the architect rebuild the building. It was the start point for his second home: Taliesin West in Phoenix desert, Arizona. It was built with material of the areas such as desert stones and sand casting. The main point of this construction are white canvas that cover the roof and moderate the natural light.

  • Unity Temple, Chicago

This building was defined by Frank as “jewel”. This construction was finished in 1909, located in Oak Park (very close to his first home). In that moment was considered as a revolution by its cubist lines, use of concrete and a different design compares with other religious temples.  Each was built by him, from furniture until stained glass.

  • Hollyhock House, Los Ángeles

The source of inspiration for this building was ancient Mayan temples and built between 1919 and 1921. This home was for the young heiress of an oil empire, the bohemian and feminist Aline Barnsdall. The work is made of reinforced concrete with blocks of prefabricated concrete. Although it has a rough appearance, there are warm interiors and spaces with a great extent. After decades of neglect, work of restoration started in 2011.

  • Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

It is an art museum, commonly know as “The Guggenheim”, which is located Fifth Avenue at 89th Street (Upper East Side neighborhood). After 16 years of outlines, blueprint and works inaugurated on 21th March in 1959. It was his last work due to the fact that he died 6 months after. A building characterized by curves, a spiral ramp which guides tourist from inferior level until a skylight under the roof.

  • Frederick C. Robie House, Chicago

This home was finished in 1910, his owner (Frederick Carlton Robie) wanted a innovated and lighted house. A house without too much ornamentation, curves lines and large rooms. The building is coat with brick and horizontal lines are construction base. In 1957 was almost demolished but the pressure of neighbors and professionals stopped it.

  • Fallingwater House, Pennsylvania

This surprising building was built above a waterfall of Bear River between 1936 and 1939. It is one of the most representative work of organic architecture, respecting and integrating in the environment. The foundation are stones and the structure is extended horizontally with corbels and terraces (except the center where fireplace). It was Edgar Kauffmann’s house and currently is one of tourist attractions of the State.

  • Casa Herbert y Katherine Jacobs, Wisconsin

And finally in 1937, Wright was challenged to build a home that would not exceed $5,000 at the time. The idea was to build a prefabricated L-shaped house with a single floor, made of 57 mm thick plywood and thus lower costs. In the end it cost 5,000 dollars but it would be the beginning of the usonian houses, that is to say,  a way in order to families of middle class had a house after living the Great Depression. This house was initially owned by Herbert Jacobs.

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